January 28

16 comments

The Charm of a Ballerina’s Bun

Well, ladies and gents!

It is no coincidence that this sleek cut, always flawless, has become an ultimate classic. Dance groups around the world, tapping on their toes, reveal why the Ballerina’s bun is the ultimate female hairstyle.

Although the hairstyle is synonymous with ballet, it has its roots in the women of Ancient Greece, who created a hairstyle known today as Greek knot. A simple, low-necked chignon, typically decorated with jewels, was a symbol of elegance for wealthy Greek women.

The bun returned to modern society during the Regency period of 1800. Anyone familiar with the movie adaptations of Jane Austen's books will recognize the stylish hairstyles that were popular among middle and upper-class women.

Women of the Regency era in England loved classical aesthetics which was associated with the fashion and hairstyles of Ancient Greece and Rome. The women began to wrap their long hair in a bun, but lift it higher than the Greek bun at the back of the head.

Well, keep reading, hun! 🙂

Victorian Era

The rise of the bun came in the Victorian period. In the 19th century, there were many variations of the bun.

"Apollo's knot" was a popular hairstyle during the 1820s and 1830s and consisted of a middle chignon and curls around the face and ears.

Another popular variant of the bun called "La Chinoise" resembled Princess Leia's famous hairstyle in Star Wars.

Queen Victoria

The "Victoria" hairstyle by Queen Victoria was a more conservative hairstyle that reflected a dark and serious Victorian England. Two braids on both sides were attached to a simple bun on the back of the head and hung around the ears.

Under the influence of Queen Victoria, the bun became a more elegant and serious hairstyle that is typically associated with the stereotype of an "oppressed" Victorian society. 

In all of these variations, however, the bun was an important symbol of the category of discrimination for many women and a reflection of the times.

Modern Years

As the Victorian bun transformed into the more relaxed and natural "Gibson Girl" chic of the 1890s, it’s dominance came to an end.

During the  1920s, fashionable ladies gave up complicated hairstyles for free buns. 

And yet the charm of the bun remains strong today and is still in vogue, signaling a classic kind of hairstyle.

In ballet, of course, it never left.

Thank you for reading this article of mine and write below your replies so that I can see them! 

And please let me know your thoughts—did you enjoy the topic? 

If there is anything else you’d be interested in reading about the Regency Era, feel free to let me know…

…and who knows? Maybe you will read about it soon!

Written by Olivia Bennet


Tags

Articles, Regency Romance


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  • I enjoyed reading this article about the different types of bun hairstyles. I would really like to know about the corset, why did they feel compelled to wear an article that affected their health to the extreme???

  • I truly appreciate the historical tidbits. So interesting and educational without having to go through google or the library.
    Thank you!!!

  • Oh yes, that Gibson Girl look is just lovely as is the Greecian Knot. I remember the many days that I spent with my daughters at practice sessions & before performances in their various ballet classes when I made them their buns as high on their head as possible & hair spraying all the small tendrils, which invariably spilt down, to make it all neat & tidy as per the instructor’s directions. The girls looked really lovely & very precise in their costumes!!

  • Fun article and interesting to learn about this hairstyle. However, I’ve worn my hair short since junior high school as haven’t the right shaped face to do long hair.

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